Moreton Bay

The Moreton Bay region consists of five major catchments: the Brisbane River, Logan-Albert Rivers, Pine Rivers, Pumicestone Passage and Caboolture River catchments; these are divided into 13 sub-catchments.

Moreton, North and South Stradroke Islands form the eastern boundary of the bay and tidal exchange between Moreton Bay and the Pacific Ocean

The background picture is of the Garden Island mangroves in southern Moreton Bay taken on a Mangrove Watch survey in August 2012.

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Moreton Bay News

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 May 2013 19:02 Written by Mangrove Hub Tuesday, 21 May 2013 18:53

“Great South East” Episode

Moreton Bay’s Citizen Scientists will appear on the Great South East on Sunday 26th May at 5.30pm demontrating the Transect-Quadrant methodology of mangrove monitoring and espousing the values of these ecosystems.

Mark it in the diary and tune in!

Great South East
 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:47 Written by Mangrove Hub Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:44

Geological Features

Moreton Bay – a Marine Park and Ramsar site – is approximately 27.5oS, 153.3oE.

The Moreton Bay region consists of five major catchments: the Brisbane River, Logan-Albert Rivers, Pine Rivers, Pumicestone Passage and Caboolture River catchments; these are divided into 13 sub-catchments. It includes the cities of Brisbane, Ipswich and Logan and as such, catchments of the Moreton Bay region are highly modified.

With a total area of 21,220 km2 the catchment, when compared to the area of Moreton Bay itself (1525 km2), represents a catchment:bay ratio of about 14:1. A series of sand islands – Moreton, North and South Stradroke Islands form the eastern boundary of the bay and tidal exchange between Moreton Bay and the Pacific Ocean occur through the North and South Passage as well as Jumpinpin and the Gold Coast seaway.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:43 Written by Mangrove Hub Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:41

Biological Values

South-East Queensland and northern New South Wales, from Cape Byron to Fraser Island, is where the fauna of northern and southern Australia meet, forming unusual communities of both temperate and tropical animal and plant species. The unique geography of Moreton Bay that has allowed the development of many different habitats has, in turn, led to a remarkable biological diversity amongst the animals and plants. This may help to explain why there appears to be relatively large numbers of apparently indigenous species – about 27 species as so far known only from Moreton Bay.

There are two main centres of biological diversity – one is the inshore zone dominated by the estuaries and the other is the eastern region dominated by the ocean. The highest species diversity within Moreton Bay is centred around the northern end of Stradbroke Island and includes Myora, Peel, Bird and Goat Islands. This region has well-developed coral reefs and a mix of consolidated hard and muddy-sand bottoms.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:37 Written by Mangrove Hub Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:32

Natural Capital = Economic Opportunities

SEQ’s natural capital provides social and economic benefits through aquatic and terrestrial recreation, agriculture, commercial fishing and tourism. Waterway dependent industries add $5 billion dollars to the economy of SEQ.

While Moreton Bay comprises only 5% of the total Queensland coastline, it represents approximately 30% of the State’s recreational fishing effort and 15% of the State’s total commercial catch.

 

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:28 Written by Mangrove Hub Wednesday, 01 May 2013 19:14

Mangrove Watch in Moreton Bay

MangroveWatch is a partnership between the scientific community and the general community – it’s ‘Citizen Science’ – the value of which is becoming more apparent.

MangroveWatch in Moreton Bay is bringing stakeholders together. Funding from the Federal Government’s Caring for our Country, OceanWatch Australia, SEQ Catchments and Wildlife Queensland Bayside Branch enables volunteers to undertake training and collect data for scientific analysis. This increases the knowledge of the participants, awareness within the community and the quality of data available for decision-makers as the east coast of Australia continues to undergo profound and rapid change.

 

Community Volunteers

A key feature of MangroveWatch is its close partnership between community volunteers and scientists from the James Cook University’s Mangrove Hub. Together they are systematically recording basic data as video and still imagery for assessments of estuarine habitat health.

Armed with expert support, training and advice, MangroveWatch volunteers in key regions are actively contributing to the monitoring of local estuaries and shorelines. An important goal in this phase of the program is to develop a network of like minded groups with the aim of producing public documents that describe important issues affecting local estuaries and mangroves, and their overall health.

Donations & Sponsorships

MangroveWatch Ltd is a registered charitable company in Australia. To achieve its goals and those of community participants, the program relies on funding and sponsorships to keep things going.

Donations and Sponsorships will be acknowledged on this site.

We need support for:

  • Community volunteers for small vessel hire and fuel
  • Field kits - costing up to $AUD3,000 each
  • Promotional items and awards such as T-Shirts and hats
  • Website maintenance
  • Computers and support for shoreline assessments by the Mangrove Hub

If you can assist any any way then contact us at the Mangrove Hub

MangroveWatch Handout

You can download our fact and information sheet to get more information about the MangroveWatch program.

Mangrove Watch Brochure

You can download our fact and information sheet (see link below) to get more information about the MangroveWatch programs.

Mangrove Watch Brochure